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with building central government capacity, which is one of the objectives of the united states and its partners. it may be portant for security gains in the short run, but it poses a long term issue. >> it sounds similar to the approach general petrais employed in iraq. is it similar or different? >> it's very different. the tribes came to the united states and asked for our help in dealing with al qaeda, which was in their midst. al qaeda were outsiders in iraq, and governing in certain parts of the anbar province. the locals didn't like that, and they wanted u.s. help in getting rid of al qaeda. they came to the united states and the united states responded to help them. in afghanistan, it's not so clear that the initiative is coming from the local communities. it seems much more driven by the international community to address the security situation, and that means that the dynamics are going to be very different than what they were in iraq. >> in terms of the obstacles to the approach in afghanistan, what would you say the main ones are, that did not exist in iraq? >> the main one is that i
of the united states pacific command. honorable chip gregson, assistant secretary of defense for asian and pacific security affairs, and david shear deputy assistant secretary of state for east asian and pacific affairs, and we welcome you gentlemen to the first hearing before this committee. we're sort of pleased that you could join us today and testify on recent security developments, involving the country of china. also, wish to welcome admiral willard's wife, donna, who is seeded behind the good admiral. and we welcome you. is the admiral missteps of that, why, you just whisper in his hair and you help them out. welcome. this is a very important and very timely hearing. it's interesting to note that just this morning, press reports indicate that google is contemplating pulling out of china, which we may discuss a bit in our hearing. now stress for some time the critical significance of developments in china to our national security. in recent years while we have been focused on events in the middle east, and south asia, china's influence has grown in asia as well as beyond. i'm ple
in iraq, and gerning inertain parts of the anbar province. they came to the united states and theunited states reonded help them. in afghanistan, it's not so clear that the initiative is coming from th local counities. it ems much more iven by the ternational community to address e security situation, and that mns that the dynamics are gog to be very different than what they were iniraq. >> in term of the obstaes to the approach afghanistan, whatould you sayhe main ones are, tt did not exist in iraq? >> the ma one is that in afghanistan,he talib is integrated into ny communities. the reason why can be difficult to tl taliban mbers from nontaliban members, they're integrat into the commity and theirisputes are localized there. in iraq, they were ousiders that camin, and itas ea to tell who they were. the great diffilty in afghanistan is thathey're integrated into th community and that makes it very diffict to come up wit permanent solutions to t kind of nflicts that are goingon. yalties can shift very quickly in ahanistan to favor whichever si is wing. >> okay. thank you very mucfor jo
the global public square." welcome and happy new year to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a terrific show for you naturally involving the attempted christmas bombing in the united states. before we get to it, i want to give you some of my own thoughts about that attempted terrorist attack. senator dianne feinstein says that she believes the united states government should overreact rather than underreact to these kinds of events. isn't that exactly backwards? the purpose of terrorism is not to kill the few hundred that are attacked, but to terrorize the tens upon tens of millions who watch. terrorism is unique as a military strategy and it defends for its effectiveness on the response of the society for it to work, all of us have to respond with fear and hysteria. so far we're doing just that. i don't mean to suggest by this that the system worked, obviously, it didn't. when u.s. officials got information from the terrorist father, they should have immediately checked if he had a visa or put him on a no-fly list. they should not have
viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. centrally involving the attempted christmas bombing in the united states, before we get to it, i want to give you some of my own thoughts about that attempted terrorist attack. senator dianne feinstein says that she believes the united states government should overreact rather than underreact to these kinds of events. isn't that exactly backwards? the purpose of terrorism is not to kill the few hundred that are attacked. but to terrorize the tens upon tens of millions who watch. terrorism is unique as a military strategy and that it depends for its effectiveness on the response of the society. for it to work all of us have to respond with fear and hysteria. so far we are doing just that. i don't meaning to suggest by this that the system worked. obviously it didn't. when u.s. officials got information from the terrorist's father they should have immediately checked if he had a visa and hut him on a no-fly list and not allowed him to enter an airplane with a bomb, makeshift bomb. these are all mistakes and should be fi
the united states and china's security relationship and encouraged by the joint statement that raumted from the president's recent visit to china. i welcome the administration's efforts to increase u.s. and china relations and cooperation in areas of common interests ranging from counterterrorism and nonproliferation to energy security. we must work together with china for the settlement of conflicts and reduction of retentions that contribute to global and regional instact including denuclearization of korean peninsula and the situation in south asia. i particular welcome the administration's support for increasing military to military contacts i've long viewed contacts is essential. it builds trust, promotes understanding, prevents conflicts and it fosters cooperation, and given my own visits to china in recent years i know how important these relationships are. looking back at u.s./china security cooperation under the previous administration, there are positive steps, but there's still much progress to be reeved. in the new administration will continue to face many challenges and i remai
that of the united states in 2027 at 4:00 in the afternoon on the 25th of december. but i wonder what you're telling us about china employs anything more than that. in other words, it's not clear that your civilization state with its tradition of tributary relations with its neighbors and yes, maybe some african countries today, have an aspiration to rule the world. could you tell us if there is, in fact, some prospect of that? that doesn't seem to be in the tradition you're describing. and therefore, why worry? >> well, i think you put your finger on a very important distinction between the chinese tradition and the western tradition. they do share, they both are civilizations which have a strong sense of university. unlike japan for example, which it never did have a. but the way that's expressed is very different. whereas the century the european tradition sought to project it at the time across the world, and i suppose the colonial tradition was the most dramatic illustration of this, the chinese tradition have to do that. and by and large, except on the territory as it were of the chinese conti
barack obama, the u.s. president, that there will be further attacks on the united states unless he takes steps to resolve the palestinian situation. in an audiotape obtained by al- jazeera on sunday, the al qaeda chief, praised the nigerian accused of the christmas day bombing." we would give a listen to a translation of that tape. -- we will get a listen to a translation of that tape. >> made peace beyond those that osama bin laden brings guidance to. our message, carried by words, conveyed to you through the flame of the hero, we have proved that the heroes of 9/11 can be effective. the message is that america will never dream of living in peace unless we lived it in palestine. it is not fear -- it is not fair that you enjoy a safe life while our brothers in gaza suffered greatly. with god's will, we will continue as long as you continue to support israel. peace be on those that follow the lead of guidance. host: that tape was released yesterday. first, a quick political note, marion barry is set to announce his retirement after seven terms, according to two sources. the move would mak
to strike the united states and were recruiting operatives to do so. the intelligence community did not aggressively follow up and prioritize streams of information related to a possible attack against the homeland. second, this contributed to a larger failure analysis, a failure to connect the dots of intelligence that existed across our intelligence community and which together could have revealed that abdul mutallab was planning an attack. third, this in turn fed into shortcomings in the watch listing system which resulted in this person not being placed on the no-fly list, thereby, allowing him to board that plane in amsterdam for detroit. in summary, the u.s. government had the information scattered throughout the system to potentially on the cover this plot and disrupt the attack rather than of failure to collect or share intelligence, this was a failure to connect and understand the intelligence that we already had. and that is why we took swift action in the days following christmas, including updating the terrorist watch list system and adding more individuals to the no-fly
first bill signing as president of the united states, president obama was upholding justice ginsburg's interpretation of the law in the dissent she filed in the 2007 decision. [applause] she once noted that dissents speak to a future age, the greatest dissents do become the dominant view. so that's the dissenter's hope, she said. they are writing not for today, but for tomorrow. and that is exactly what happened in this case. i was serving as the chief of staff to the first lady in the clinton administration when president clinton announced the nomination of justice ginsburg as only the second woman to the highest court. he said at the time that she was brilliant, had a compelling life story whose record was interesting. she was independent, progressive, but we were cheering because she was a champion for women's rights. the justice and i share a very, very dear friend. national public radio's legal correspondent for the supreme court, nina totenberg. nina reminded me that justice ginsburg began her crusade for gender equality in partnership with her husband marty, with whom she shar
unit. the united states is a major contributor to the afghan reconstruction trust fund. for those of you have been concerned about the effectiveness of the donors, i would suggest that you looked at this as an example of something that has shown the effectiveness as a good instrument. i would just talk about what is new. as mentioned, until now, we have been responsible for about $7 billion in the execution of development and assistance programs -- assistance programs since january 2002. we were there a few weeks after the taliban were dispersed. this was at the end of 2001. we have another $2 billion for this year and i expect that this will go higher. one thing that we will be focusing heavily on his job creation. the major element of this -- this is agriculture. we agree on that completely and we shared a briefing with the press a few weeks ago. this is a partnership with the state department and the u.s. department of agriculture, along with the national guard units and the development teams in afghanistan. in the case of afghanistan, we're trying to support a policy for afgha
of drugs, the purchasing of drugs in the united states and western europe. until we deal with the current until we deal with the current -- the issue of consumption, we h supply. many believe that mexico is fighting the u.s. problem. drugs are still reaching the u.s. market. guest: if we don't participate, it creates a griddle next national security issue? guest: we need to participate but there are many things united states could do like to deal with the flow of arms out of most mexicans are being killed by weapons exporter from the united states. where is all the money going? why can we open a bank accounts and find out where the money from this terrible curse is actually going? host: is it your view that drug consumption has bite in the last few years? guest: very much so. we have a much wider variety of stuff that people can buy, unfortunately. host: first up is syracuse on and democrats . caller: 01 to ask about haiti and the bill clinton policy and that record -- i wanted to ask about haiti and the bill clinton policy in that regard. there's an issue about the phone company privatiz
, the united states supreme court handed a huge victory to the special interests and lobbyists and a powerful blow to our efforts to rein and corporate influence. it's strikes at our democracy itself. by a 5-4 vote, the court overturned more than a century of law, including a bipartisan campaign finance lot written by john mccain and russ feingold that barred corporations from using the nato clout by running advertisements for or against candidates. this opens the floodgates for an unlimited amount of special interest money into our democracy. this gives the special interest lobbyists new leverage to spend millions on average -- on advertising, swaying voters to vote their way or punishing those who did not. that means any public servant who has the courage to stand up to special interest and stand up for the american people can find themselves under assault come election time. even foreign corporations can now get into the action. i cannot think of anything more devastating to the public interest. the last thing we need to do is hand more influence to the lobbyists in washington or more powe
started talking about a stimulus package in the united states that was coupled -- and i stress this point -- that was coupled with an indication of how we are going to deal with the united states' medium term budget problems. we will see the largest buildup in peacetime public debt. how we deal with that is critical. i was talking about an "l" shaped recovery, i was not really focusing on the downside risks that i see. i would say some of them have been mentioned and have a very good chance of materializing in 200010. -- in 2010. the middle of 2010 is the short term. the long term is beyond 2010. the full risks that i would indicate -- the four risks that i would indicate, and i would put them in the order of the way i worry about them. the first is the situation in europe. philip correctly mentioned parallels with the convertibility plan. these countries really have to be dealing with budget deficits that are in double digits in the middle of a recession without having an exchange rate mechanism or independent monetary policy to deal with it. that is a risk. that is a train wreck waiting
the politics of this in the united states are going to force this administration to draw down substantially before 2012. one thing i think is certain, we certainly will not have achieved lasting security change, if that's the case. what i do think is this, i think that by mid 2011, we will have a pretty good idea whether or not this strategy, the mcchrystal strategy, the obama strategy, has a chance of succeeding. if by the middle of 2011, which will be 12 months after we've gotten all of the forces or at least most of the forces in the theater, we've ramped up civilian advisers to around 1,000 or so at beginning of 2009 we've begun working regional diplomacy. if by mid 2011 we don't see any sign of change, then we've learned something. the patient was dead. president obama inherited a dead patient on the table. and we cannot rebuild the avenue -- afghan state. if that's the case, we're in a difficult situation. there's no simple, let's say let's all come home. pretend it's not a problem. more will probably not be the answer. staying on indefinitely will not be the answer. and quitting will
other nation in the united states. there are more is really nasdaq companies than japanese, than canadian and british and german than anything. it's extraordinary. capitalism hasn't been shown to fail. capitalism has been shown to work and here in the united states there is a tremendous amount of self pity this of course encouraged by the victimhood. one of the things on my radio show is the michael medved show where we are proud to say every day i am not a victim the idea of american victimhood suggests our standard of living and difficulties in our choices it's much lower. we can't live the kind of lives our parents live and it's getting worse and everyone has heard this. it is nonsense. robert wright. heritage in this building has some terrific work on this and i quote him extensively in the book. if you actually look at any meaningful measure of living standards in the united states the progress under the capitalist america particularly since 1980 has been dazzling, unprecedented. the options available to people, the extended life expectancy and for college we are now at a st
bork for the supreme court of the united states, and september 17 when i traveled to philadelphia with the president, it was a thursday and i missed my opportunity to question judge bork. and i got that opportunity on saturday morning, and i was the only one there and had -- at least there were only a few people there and had an opportunity to question judge bork for an hour and a half. and ultimately, played a key role in the rejection of the nomination of judge bork who believed in original intent and had a very, very different view of the constitution. did not believe in due process of law. that was not part of the constitution, and he disagreed with the incorporation of the ten amendments through the due process clause to apply to the states. and that was a momentous supreme court hearing. during the years of president george h.w. bush, there were many matters of note. one that stands out was the confirmation proceeding as to justice souter, and when justice souter was up for confirmation and i participated in that as a member of the judiciary committee as i have participated
to establish a good relationship with the president of the united states because the united states is so a important to our vital interests, economic, security interests. they are our best ally and closest neighbor. they are our very best friend in the world as well and we should not forget that. we have established a good relationship. we have been working to align our approach is on a number of economic and environmental issues. i enjoy working with president obama. i do not envy him. his challengers are much greater than mine. they have so many more global responsibilities dain canada but the problems with the economy, health care, you name it, there frankly so much more. i do not envy his position. as i have said to my american friends, we are here to try and be helpful while protecting our own interests. >> you were recently in china. let's get your perception of the premier who seemed to give you a dressing down for taking so long to come. they are in very powerful players. when was your perception? >> we attend international summits quite regularly and i have had a chance to have
going to come to the fore. i think independents might. in many states in the united states today, there are more registered independents or unenrolled or the states have different names for them. who are not affiliated with either party. and i think there are more people -- i'm not the only person who is fed up with the high level of partisanship, and i think, you know, there have already been independents elected governors in some states, some local communities are getting rid of party designations for, you know, races for mayor and city council, so i think we may see slowly perhaps a rise of the independents politically. >> thank you. >> hi, i'm from washington jefferson college. you actually already answered two of my questions, but i guess i was wondering, since barack obama already, you know, tried to enhance the role of the congress, by letting them do what they're supposed to do, do you think that he will continue this encouragement and have them keep doing what they're supposed to do or do you think that the criticism of what he tried to do will maybe stop him in the futu
, and here in the united states there is a tremendous amount of self-pity that is encouraged by the victim. one of the things in my ratio is it's the michael medved show where we're proud to say everyday i am not a victim, the idea of american victimhood suggest that our standard of living and our difficulties and our choices, it's all much lower, we can't live the kind of lives that our parents live and it's getting worse. everyone has heard this. it is nonsense. now, robert rector rodger at heritage writer in the building has done terrific work on this and i quote him extensively in the book. if you actually look at any meaningful measure of living standards in the united states, the progress under capless american, particularly since 1980, has been dazzling, has been unprecedented. the options that are available to people, the extended life expectancy, college, we're now at at a stage where the majority of american young people in every ethnic group, are pursuing some form of post high school graduation after they graduate from high school. this is phenomenal. sometimes that education m
relations with the united states in 1995. hen knoy's overwhelming goal was to win favorable trade deals with the united states and admission to globaled bodies like the world trade organization, bringing up unpleasant subjects like agent orange, worked against that strategy. but having detained these schools, hanoi has begun to press its demands and is demanding compensation for the suffering of its people and that has put the united states in a tough spot. not wanting to set a precedent but on the other hand recognizing vietnam is an increasingly vital military security allies and trading partner. it also raises a larger issue of what responsibility to the u.s. military has to clean up the environmental messes after the war a run. meanwhile another hidden problem with agent orange is impacting our veterans. with each passing year medical researchers are discovering many illnesses many of them major chronic diseases like parkinson's for which exposure to the agent orange turns out to be a risk factor. hundreds of thousands have been denied va care for years and is said they avoided for
of the united states. this same strategy of dividing the opposition has actually worked before to win counterinsurgency campaigns. there have been very few counterinsurgency campaigns that have been successful in the 20th century, but the defeat of the philippine rebels after the spanish-american war at the turn of the last century, the u.s. backed greek governments defeat of the guerrillas in 1947, and the british defeated the chinese insurgency in the 1950s, all of those have the same thing in common, that they split the opposition. however, in iraq the ethnosectarian fishers are still great. and i don't think the show is over yet. in my book, "partitioning for peace," which is on, what to do about iraq, i go through so the other ethnocentric conflict in world history and find a violent sometimes as the usually always returns unless the underlying issues have been resolved, which they have in iraq. they don't have an oil law which is their bread and butter commodity so you can see the level of disagreement in society. and of course, they have struggled even to get a date for the ele
it is that defines what health insurance is acceptable if you're an individual citizen in the united states? is it the individual citizen? is it the 22-year-old that says i can't afford health insurance right now and i'm very healthy and i'm making the decision not to get health insurance, is he the one that decides what acceptable health insurance coverage is? of course, the answer is no. no, the answer is that the federal government knows what you need better than you do. and so the federal government is going to mandate that you have this coverage, and they're going to tell you what kind of coverage it is and you got to buy it. now, this raises kind of an interesting legal point, and that is, if the government mandates thaw have something or buy -- that you have something or buy something, isn't that essentially a tax increase? is that when you mandate that somebody has to buy a particular product, is that something that the federal government should be doing in this particular area? is it even constitutional? when it is a mandate, is it essentially a tax increase? or pay 2.5% of income
where china is growing 9% a year and the united states remains, you know, slowly crawling out of a recession. there is a sense that we are saddled with debt and they are booming. are we witnessing some kind of power transition? >> you know, i think phrasing it in terms of a power transition, fareed, makes what's always a mistake in the economic area, which is to think in terms of zero sum games. we are witnessing an incredible and profound change in china and india and in many other emerging countries. we're seeing living standards grow for more people, more quickly than in any point in u.s., in global history. that is a hugely positive thing and it is a very fundamental thing. but that success is not, if we pursue the right policies, a threat to the united states. it is an enormous opportunity. it is more potential for us to grow our capacity to export than there ever has been before. that's why the president set a goal of doubling our exports over the next five years in the state of the union in creating 2 million jobs in the process. it is more potential for the united stat
the mood here -- enormous am of enemies. you see a -- the united states remains slowly crawling out a recession. there is a sense we are saddled with debt. are we witnessing some kind of power transition? >> you know, i think phrasing it in terms of a power transition, fareed, makes what's always a mistake in the economic area. which is to think in terms of zero subgames. we are witnessing an incredible and profound change in china and india and in many other emerging countries. we are seeing living standards grow from more people, more quickly, than at any point in global history. that is a hugely positive thing and it is a very fundamental thing. but that success is not if we pursue the right policies a threat to the united states. it is an enormous opportunity, it is more potential for us to grow our capacity, export than there ever has been before. that's why the president set a goal of doubling our exports over the next five years in the state of the union it created 2 million jobs. and in the process. it is more potential for the united states to benefit from lower priced prod
to be a sustained policy after the first action, does the united states then support future actions or does it say never again, that this cannot occur again? all the while dealing with the aftermath of then is really strike and the implications that entail. finally, if this does not come to pass, and iran, diplomacy does not work in israel does not strike then we are going to be focusing a large part of the coming year and afterwards on confidence-building and reassurance among our allies as we try to build a containment regime to deal with nuclear iran. i would raise the question one of the main challenges we will face in confidence building is how to convince the allies that a country that was unable to prevent iran from achieving the outcome we defined as unacceptable, that is acquiring nuclear weapons, will also be able to have the willpower and resolve to deter nuclear iran and we will face challenges in our theater engagement strategy and trying to build a containment architecture to do with nuclear iran if that comes to pass. just a couple of quick comments about the whole issue of strategi
students from all over the united states. i've been associated with this program as faculty director for about 10 years. and this is a program which is very dear to my heart. and we have consistently had some of the best, most authoritative speakers available. and cerda, this is true of juan zarate. there is a scene in the 1975 movie about the watergate invasion, all the presidents men. and there's a meeting in an underground washington garage and watch how holbrook, playing an informant known by the name of deep throat, tells robert redford playing bob warburg, the "washington post" reporter, that if he wants to find out who is responsible for the water great burglary, at democratic party headquarters, at the watergate, you should follow the money. well, we have some here today who has followed money. in his capacity as deputy assistant secretary of the treasury. and this was a job that really involves one of the most complex tasks in the antiterrorism effort. that have these people get their money, how they spend their money, and it takes a person with uncommon diligence and uncomm
. the murder rate in the united states in 1991 was -- there were 24,000 murders. the population is roughly two of its 60 million. last year in afghanistan, 2000 afghans died in the violence but the population of afghanistan was roughly 30 million. do the math. . . why did the afghans -- what is your view of the future? when americans ask this question, i am surprised only 17% said that. if u.s. afghans the same question, 40% had the view. but as a surprising answer, given that we're the most corrupt country in the world, but the reason afghans have this answer is because this looks like what we have lived through. each one of these would be devastating to a country, so even though we know all the problems, what is going on is better than the last -- then the past. almost none of the refugees have returned. refugees did not return to a place they do not think they have a future, and afghans do not think they have a future. many people, including girls, when asked if they have more freedom, 75% said yes. let's say we solve afghanistan given what i have said, there is still a problem with pakista
discrimination. now it is noteworthy that in his first bill signing as president of the united states, president obama was upholding justice ginsburg's interpretation of the law in the dissent she filed in the 2007 decision. [applause] she once noted that dissents speak to a future age, the greatest dissents do become the dominant view. so that's the dissenter's hope, she said. they are writing not for today, but for tomorrow. and that is exactly what happened in this case. i was serving as the chief of staff to the first lady in the clinton administration when president clinton announced the nomination of justice ginsburg as only the second woman to the highest court. he said at the time that she was brilliant, had a compelling life story whose record was interesting. she was independent, progressive, but we were cheering because she was a champion for women's rights. the justice and i share a very, very dear friend. national public radio's legal correspondent for the supreme court, nina totenberg. nina reminded me that justice ginsburg began her crusade for gender equality in partnership with
-- the world's leading communication nation, the united states, has been at least until recently outcommunicated by mass murdered living in the most remote areas of afghanistan and pakistan. and we have to take the public information space back from the enemy in order to succeed. and ashley is pioneered such creative ideas as using cell phone technology and such obviously ideas as countering their abuse of low wattage fm station to say terrible lies. next to her, is valley nee 15. he came to us from and has just written another one of the wonderful books. he was working on pakistan for us and not on iran, since that always appeared in the blogs inaccurately. i think we are missing someone. tim who came to us from afghanistan. a representing the future of the foreign service. we have a whole lot of other people in the back there, including in the department, from nine other agent sis plus the state department. strobe, what i'd like to say, the most common question i get in when i walk down the street or run into people is the most valid. why are we in afghanistan? that's a fair qu
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places on the face of the planet. but this bill is about priorities on the united states of america. we are $12 trillion in debt. we're spending $600 million a day just in interest on that debt. this congress momentarilyly is going to have to raise -- moltary is going to have to raise the debt ceiling another $1 trillion. we don't have the money to do this. currently the national park service has an estimated $9 billion in backlog. $9 billion that they need to help with the national parks to preserve and to upgrade what we already have in our current holding. what the president will probably say in less than eight hours, create this air of oh, we have to be a little fiscally responsible. we ought to freeze a few things. for the second time in just over a week here we are going to come and look at this bill to acquire at the cost of $40 million to $50 million property with funds that we don't have. no longer can this government continue to use the government credit card -- decide to vote in favorite of this bill although it's just an authorization, although it's not an appropriation, are
the united states to have at least one corridor of substantial length that's served by a japanese or a european-style high-speed railroad? >> i think it's important that first off we wait and see what is applied for. you know, obviously i can't start commenting on what we're going to do until applications come forward and are weighed, you know, graded and then approved but clearly again i think we understand the need to ensure that we have very tangible, very, you know, substantial successes. and, you know, clearly again our vision is to follow the model of what the europeans have advanced. you know, keep in mind, when when the system in spain first opened up, you know, again ms. fleming talked about how essentially they begin with one trunk line, they did. they began with their one trunk line. essentially it was six to eight trains a day run being 125 miles an hour and from that they were so successful that they incrementally made the improvements that got them to roughly 20 trains a day at speeds of 200 miles an hour. so this is going to take a buildout, you know, a buildout muc
is highly unlike in the case of the united states. it is potentiay possible in the case of rael. we know th the united states, starting under the george w. bush administrion, has had a reportedly $400 million cove program to support gups in iran engaged in activiti to destabize the islamic republic i suppose you codn't completely rule out the possility that a group that is receivingupport from u.s. intelligence might have rried out th aassination of this professor intehran, but i would be very surprised t learn that they had bee explicitly directed to do so b the cia or any other part of the u.s. telligence community. that would be a violation of both american law and longstanding policy t to participate inoreign assassinatio. in the case of israel, there a track record that israeli intelligence wl arrangeor engage in, pticipate in assainations of foreign nationals that they believe constitute a threat to israeli interests. ibviously don't ow that that was the case. in t assassinatio of this iranianprofessor. but there certainly is that histor there. >> talk in a bit more detail what the u.
that united states wanted out of vietnam and would not mind if they've lost on the battlefield and would not mind if a vietnam went communist. this is a point* where we have 550,000 troops in the country and be a no. i can assure you none of those 530,000 that the commander in chief said it is okay if we lose the war the reason why it nixon thought it would be 0k which she thought he had already lost was two achieve more detente with the soviet union and felt that was the overriding goal the superpowers must find a way to exist as peacefully court with other configuration but this was on par with the belief in that expressed in articles and foreign affairs in 1967 with speeches to the republican conventions and the movers and shakers clubs and just prior to that, it is not possible to isolate 1 billion chinese and have a say in a world in the future. it is very difficult for us to say he was wrong about that. i think he was quite effectively correct but the problem was he also felt that the same time you could not have an open at three and discussion of these issues and expect to come ou
and attention to the policies of freedom itself not only in the united states but around the world. for the first lecture we asked, is freedom for everyone? the speaker did so eloquently that our subsequent speakers have matched. we have heard from economic freedom, religious freedom, on whether the united nations advances the cause of freedom and the important relationship between security and freedom. advancing freedom is a major goal of the heritage foundation and important work that we do here. in fact tomorrow, we will release in hong kong and washington the 16th edition of the index of economic freedom. you will want to stay tuned because there is a bit of big and i'm afraid bad news in the index score for freedom in the united states. our speaker today is dr. charles krauthammer. on december 25, he described president obama's first year in office the year of living fec tilously. most of us know that he writes a column for the "washington post." less known is that he is a harvard educated medical doctor who was a resident of psychiatry at massachusetts general hospital. in 19
to either accept or contain iran or something like that is going to happen and here's the united states saying we want to continue the bush policy saying iran has to stop. it is in richmond. so why not change the policy to say okay we will allow iran enriched uranium under these terms and inspection and so on or otherwise we are setting ourselves up for failure and that is why i think it is wrong to make a test because if you need to test something you can't achieve of course you are going to get an f. >> i believe you can achieve something. i don't agree with that narrative and i don't believe the scenario with iran is automatically one that depends on complete -- >> what is achievable? >> what is achievable is changing the environment around iran was within the middle east and other great states like india, china and russia to essentially both running room to spread its influence through transnational networks also closed on other opportunities but then to offer what i think obama wanted to which was a constructive course, i am not a believer in that kind of hillary clinton's style of
, the house of representatives is the greatest society of frequent flyers in the entire united states, so they obviously understood personally, in a way that, you know, not everybody would, what it's like to be an an airline and have somebody lighting up next to you, so we worked very closely with all of these groups. they mobilized their grassroots entities, they all -- who all were incredibly effective aft contacting people in their states, who then contacted their members and the tobacco industry, this is -- this issue, it happened -- took place such a long time ago, so things are very different than they are now, but the tobacco industry strongly opposed to this. members who represented tobacco industry strongly opposed this, and it was a huge struggle, and he offered the amendment on the floor, we ended up winning by a very small majority, but i think it was really good example of how, you know, one member, pretty junior member really, working with a very effective grassroots coalition, with strong ties in d.c., and also we also had a very, very good piece of scientific information t
the united states is with regard to health care costs. you might think we spend a lot because we are rich. that is not the case at all. on the vertical asked -- access, we have how much we spend per person. and then on the vertical ac xes we have a much the country spends -- how rich the country is. the u.s. spends about twice as much per person as other countries do on health care. we are 56% higher than the swiss. why are costs high are here? this is what i will be focusing on. there are economic, political, historical ones. i have come up with a list of four reasons why i think health care costs are higher in the united states than elsewhere. a lack of consolidation of purchasing power, medical technology and specialization, paying for unnecessary care and fee-for-service medicine. i am only going to talk about the first one of these. i will leave the others at the end because john skinner will talk about the other three in his talk. to understand lack of consolidation, take a counter example which would be canada. canada has a single payer system. there is only one buyer of care in ca
has more companies listed on the nasdaq than any other nation in the united states. there are more is really nasdaq companies and japanese come a canadian, british or german or anything. capitalism has not been shown to fail but to work. here in the united states there is a tremendous amount of self pity that is a encouraged by the victim would mentality. one of the things of my radio show michael medved every day we are proud to say i am not a victim. the idea of victimhood suggest this standard of living and the difficulties in choices are lower we cannot live the kind of lives are parents lived and everybody has heard this. it is nonsense. right here in the building we have done terrific work on this and i quote him extensively. if you look at any meaningful measure of living standards, the progress under capitalistic america has been dazzling and unprecedented. options available to people the extended life expectancy or opportunities for college rear at this stage where the majority of american young people in every ethnic group are pursuing some form of post high school gradua
as techs and resources stocks weigh. and i'm mike huckman in the united states. the economy likely grew at the fastest pace in four years in the fourth quarter, but experts say don't start celebrating just yet. >> hello and welcome to today's program. i'm once again here at the annual meeting of the world economic forum in davos. maria will be joining us shortly, as well. we have a great guest list for you today. we'll be joined we the chief executive of bank of america, brian moynihan. we'll talk to christine lagarde, the french finance minister. we'll be joined by lord mannedelson, amongst a whole host of other guests. we'll be joined by the ceo of china mobile. but before all of that, there's plenty we need to bring you to. christine, over to you. >> hey, ross, good to see you in davos. let's do a quick view where asian markets are trading today. we have earnings in the u.s. are failing to disappoint. they hit some of the tech sector stocks here in asia. of course, we have those concerns about greece and portugal and that seems to be weighing on sentiment, as well. the hang seng off
at the united states and there's a lot of evidence that employment has been cut their rapidly and more significantly men in some sense warranted by demand. and this is reflected and so has investments in inventories it's that iraq and this is reflected much better than expected earnings of nonfinancial corporate, by the way not just in the united states but in europe as well in the course of a 2009. and a strong provincial position. this suggests to me that along with many others i expect a turn in the employment picture. especially given the latest numbers coming from the p.m. i, that suggest that we are still on a strong expansion path. the other two factors that i will point to one which go beyond deferring them souse, are in the order of importance i would say policies remain supportive in 2010. a large part of the stimulus package is still to be spent supporting to the omb. i think it's only about a third of the stimulus money has been spent in this country. financial support of the banking system remains. i'm actually encouraged by the fact that the largest banks in the united st
obama has learned is that it is really hard to be president of the united states. [laughter] really, is a nightmare of a job. his american power is about two contradictory things. on the one thing, -- on the one hand, as a global, leading power, we are trying to keep the status pretty much in quo. on the other hand, there is this seedings source of capitalist renewal -- seething source of capital is renewal. we are causing as much trouble when we are inventing the internet as when we are invading iraq. we are blowing up the status quo at the same time that we are trying to defend it and the president of the united states is caught at the board tax of these conflicting issues. president obama -- at the vortexes of these conflicting issues -- the vortexes of these conflicting issues. use of president obama having to wrestle with all of these tensions. could you imagine the nerve it took to walk into closed-door sessions, blowing up diplomatic protocol. in doing this, not knowing if it was born to work. -- going to work. i wrote about an important moment for president obama. this will
, whose the commission of the irs, and jefrey zients, our chief performance officer of the united states. here in our nations capital there are a number of ways to advance the ideals and interests of the american people. often is done through congress. but it can also be done through what's called a presidential memorandum, a directive that i get to cabinet secretaries and federal government employees to change how our government works. in a few moments, i will issue one of these directives to help stop government contracts from going to companies that are seriously delinquent in their taxes. this is not simple a matter of signing a piece of paper or taking a bureaucratic act. by issuing this directive, all of us in washington will be required to be more responsible stewards of your tax dollars. all across this country, there are people who meet their obligations each and everyday. you do your jobs. you support your family's. you pay the taxes you will, because it's a fundamental responsibility of citizenship. and yet somehow, it's become standard practice in washington to give contracts
. and they are a critical source of support for north korean defectors in south iraq and in the united states. the roughly 100 north koreans in the united states are receiving help from corian and non-corian christian churches. -- korean and non-korean christian churches. i think that christians play an important role. >> we will try to squeeze in a few more questions. >> peter, thank you for your kind words. you mentioned the exchange-rate issue in german unification. any economist would say that the exchange rate policy that was settled upon by the german government hyde -- made no rational sense whatsoever, but there were powerful political crash -- but pressures of work -- powerful political pressures at work. what do you see the pressures of work on that issue when it comes time for the koreas to unify? who you think will be the contending forces? -- who do you think will be the contending forces? >> that is another really good question that i have not really started to consider. i will just give you a top of the head answer. given that trade unions are really only present at the top table, i think
condemnation not for dictators but for the united states and. it was a clear attempt to try to discredit this organization. i have followed washington politics long enough to know that when top officials attack you instead of ignoring you it is because they are scared of you. the white house's attack on the group's credibility for me at that time was a clear affirmation of amnesty international integrity and power. we are talking about look bush administration but it is important to note that president obama signed the national defense authorization act that endorses another attempt by the u.s. government to conduct military commission trial. amnesty international and irene khan are once again pushing and changing the way we see human rights. in a new campaign called demand dignity amnesty international is seeking to leave poverty caused to human-rights. irene khan argues that party remains a global epidemic because it continues to be defined as an economic problem that should be addressed in foreign aid and investment. in her new book "the unheard truth: poverty and human rights," she s
of female soldiers have any 21st century united states army. we fail to talk about what it's like for commanders now with the 12 to 18 months of the well time to prepare for a 12-month deployment, what it's like to build teams, and how -- all the things that go into building teams in keeping them together. there's a lot of great stuff to talk about there and we just missed the opportunity because we got caught up in other things. but as far as my formations and the intent, my intent been understood by the soldiers and i don't have any second -- i don't have any issues with that at all. i think we are ok. >> general, american forces press corps. going to a more mundane things appear if it was the situation in and around mosul and what are your troops going to do on the election or for the election? >> great question it. you're first question was about mosul and the second one was about the election. mosul, mosul has got to elements of two iraqi divisions. iraqi army divisions. we do not have an iraqi police primacy in mosul ads because of the iraqi police strength is not sufficient
's to the united states. look at the babies taking care of babies. that bus had to turn around. the state department is allowing children with adoptions in process, already, to get temporary visas. officials will not accept kids if they cannot verify their paperwork is in order. such desperation. >>> california is getting another beating from the weather today. there's a state of emergency in parts of the state. hundreds are wait iing for evacuations to be lifted after the mud slides. in san diego, the longer the rain came down, the worse things got. >> this was a river. it was a river. it literally was a river. >> it was draining very well, even in the heavy rain. the pumps -- something must have stopped or part of them. the rain stopped and the water started backing up. >> conditions are bad now, but you may get a break from the rain soon. bob van dillen is keeping an eye on things. good morning. >> good morning. i want to start with the big picture. a couple storms are out there. the one from yesterday is back inland around idaho and nevada. you can see the frontal boundary as it exten
operation is being done mostly by the united states, by the u.n., by the other foreign and international forces who have been coming here, but everybody is careful to say that it's done in coordination and at the behest of the haitian government. >> christiane, thanks very much. this important programming note. christiane's program will be lived from port-au-prince this sunday, 2:00 p.m. eastern. american donations to earthquake relieved now have topped $355 million, our brian todd has been tracking the flow of aid and the rescue efforts. he found himself at the center of an attempt to save a dying boy's life. >> reporter: those who run critical aid through this airport stung by complaints that supplies aren't touching down when they should, not getting off the tarmac fast enough now say they have streamlined the operation. >> the aid is flowing in, not only from the united states government and the united states military, but all around the world. >> reporter: officials say up to 160 flights a day are coming through, compared with about 25 just after the earthquake, but this is also whe
.s. passport. >> yes. >> reporter: and you've made this trip between the united states and nigeria many, many times? >> yes. about 20 times. >> reporter: really. dating back how far? >> 1995. >> reporter: this is emmanuel's boarding pass from the flight on christmas day, flight 253. >> as the pilot announced the descent into the detroit area, this sound. >> reporter: five rose directly in front of him an explosive device ignites. >> people started screaming, oh, there's smoke, there's smoke. >> reporter: the plane lands and what goes through your mind. >> i just expressed to god thank you for my life. >> reporter: alive, but soon under scrutiny. his name and travel records flash red flags to government officials on the ground. cnn learned emmanuel was tracked in a massive database called taks. >> they were picking some people at random for questioning. >> reporter: did they ever say that you were part of a government database that tracks people when they fly? >> not at all, not at all. >> reporter: the government database houses everything from immigration violations and criminal records to w
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